And prevention of cancer is producing innovations that may radically improve care for the disease.

$145M Federal Government effort to harness power of nanotechnology to improve cancer patients A $145-million Federal Government effort to harness the energy of nanotechnology to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer is producing innovations that may radically improve care for the disease. That’s the summary of an revise on the status of this program, known as the National Tumor Institute Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer. It seems in ACS Nano, a monthly journal published by the American Chemical Society. Piotr colleagues and Grodzinski take note in the article that the alliance, launched in 2004, funds and coordinates research specifically intended to move understanding about the small science out of laboratories and into hospitals and doctors offices in a big method.‘We are in need of a new vision for academic medicine,’ they write. ‘We have to articulate and demonstrate the economic and social worth that academic medication provides. And we need a global perspective.’ Others question how academic medicine handles gender issues. Researchers in the United States argue that improving gender equity instead of gender equality is essential for a revitalised educational medicine, a strengthened health workforce, and improved general public wellness. Canadian doctors discuss conflicts involving academic independence, while two editorials highlight how educational medicine can help improve wellness in developing countries. Finally, in a letter to the BMJ, many authors argue that the governance of academic medicine should be turned over to open public trustees.